Ada’s Ideas: the story of Ada Lovelace, the world’s first computer programmer

Ada's Ideas book cover

This is a picture book biography of Ada Lovelace, who could be called the world’s first computer programmer.

Picture book, biography, nonfiction
Dewey: 510.92
Interest Level: 3 and up; Reading Level: 4.3
4 out of 5 stars


Ada has a fascinating background. Her father was Lord Byron, the poet and her mother was a wealthy woman who was a mathematician. Ada’s mother was very controlling, and didn’t want Lord Byron and his “wild ways” to influence their child, so she took Ada away at a month old and never allowed her to see her father.

Young Ada’s days were filled with structured learning and lots of studying numbers. After contracting the measles, she spent three years doing nothing but studying because she was too weak to walk. Ada grew up with almost no friends and was not allowed to pursue her own interests.
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When she was 17, Ada met Charles Babbage, an engineer, mathematician, and inventor. Ada was enthralled with Babbage and his inventions of engines that would do mathematical calculations. Ada worked on complicated algorithms that would work in the Analytical Engine, and envisioned that eventually the Engine could be programmed to do more than just math, but also create pictures, music, and words. In other words, she envisioned the computer.

Ada’s story is one that inspires people to never give up their dreams and to not be held back by the limits society or other people place on your life. This book would have meaning for older students, grades 5 and up. There is a biography in the back of the book. It is rather small, which could be why the book is fairly vague and reads in a general manner.


Ada’s ideas: The story of Ada Lovelace, the world’s first computer programmer
by Fiona Robinson
Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2016

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